Pediatric nursing

Pediatric nursing

Pediatric nursing is the medical care of neonates and children up to adolescence, usually in an in-patient hospital or day-clinic. Pediatrics comes from the Greek words 'paedia' which means child, 'iatrike' which means physician. 'Paediatrics' is the British/Australian spelling and 'pediatrics' is the United States spelling.
Pediatric nurses and pediatric nurse practitioners work in a wide range of settings from doctor's offices and community-based settings to hospitals and critical care facilities. Pediatric Nurses may also assist paediatricians or work alongside them whilst providing care to the children. They provide care to children and adolescents in all aspects of their growth and well being. Pediatric nurses give primary care services such as diagnosing and treating most common childhood illnesses and developmental screenings. Acute care and specialty services are also available for the chronically ill children. Some pediatric nurses and nurse practitioners focus on a specialty area, such as cardiology, dermatology, gastroenterology or oncology.
Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNP) play a large role in the lives of young people in both sick and also healthy children. To become a pediatric nurse practitioner you will need to go to school for at least two years after earning a bachelor's degree, and you'll need to apply to your state board of nursing to be recognized as an advanced practice nurse. There is also a separate examination that must be sat and passed in order for a pediatric nurse to practice as a PNP.
Patient education helps to enhance treatment results. Nurses must be inclined to work with children at various levels of understanding because in this field of nursing, patient is especially challenging. Children needs someone to help them adapt to the hospital setting and prepare them for medical treatments and procedures, and as a patient educator, pediatric nurses are responsible for this care. Nurses also coach parents to observe and wait for important signs and responses to therapies, to build and increase the child's comfort, and even to provide advanced care.
Another form of patient education is counseling. Injury-prevention strategies and anticipatory guidance is provided in counseling to boost development. Helping the child or family solve a problem is often the focus in counseling with the responsibility of the advanced practice nurses or other experienced nurses.

 


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